© baskervillles

(Source: gerardwayjacketslut)

32 minutes ago  -  1,417 notes  -  via  -  ©

my-innocence-is-lost:

owlmylove:

craized:

trees like these are the best to sit under and read books or draw or just relax and be alone 

or you can climb it and sit up in the foliage waiting for unsuspecting pedestrians to walk by so you can swing down on one of the roots with a Tarzan scream and kick them in the face before running from the traffic cops

two kinds of people.

(Source: samuelfriberg)

32 minutes ago  -  342,356 notes  -  via  -  ©
Never be afraid to apologize to your child. If you lose your temper and say something in anger that wasn’t meant to be said, apologize. Children need to know that adults can admit when they are wrong.

American Humane Society (via maninsun)

This is so, so important.

(via foundbysara)

32 minutes ago  -  65,764 notes  -  via  -  ©

indie-moonlight:

walk-barefoot:

Galaxies in a bottle pretty much

amazing

(Source: reyairia)

33 minutes ago  -  204,754 notes  -  via  -  ©

(Source: dnyce2fly3)

33 minutes ago  -  22,664 notes  -  via  -  ©

James McAvoy takes the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

(Source: amy-poehlerbear)

35 minutes ago  -  2,678 notes  -  via  -  ©

grrrlfever:

wouldnt it be cool to just like not feel nervous about everything all the time

(Source: lesbolution)

35 minutes ago  -  614,289 notes  -  via  -  ©

measure-of-intent:

"Good food does lead to sex. As it should. And in a perfect world, good music does too."

-Anthony Bourdain

36 minutes ago  -  267 notes  -  via  -  ©

chibird:

It’s so great to see these things in people. I have so much respect for people who listen and care when you talk. 

38 minutes ago  -  16,047 notes  -  via  -  ©

queerminho:

I think the biggest problem with JK was that she made the most hated female characters (like Cho, Lavender, Pansy) the most realistic ones. Like. Tbh I’m emotional like Cho, I’m obsessive in my relationship at times like Lavender (but we’ve been together for almost five years now lol), and I’ve mocked quite a few girls in school like Pansy. I don’t relate to Hermione or Ginny at all, I feel, and I don’t like that JK’s pretty much like “Pansy didn’t marry anybody because I hate her” when there is a little bit of Pansy in each of us, some more than others.

SUBMITTED BY drcomalfoy 

((yes i feel this. thank you for giving me an opportunity to talk about this okay. i have so many things pansy parkinson is my girl.))

It isn’t their personalities that are the problem, but rather, how she treated them. Hermione and Ginny’s good traits are realistic, but the issue lies in no one ever calling them out when they display problematic traits. Like Ginny treating Fleur like shit for no good reason or Hermione’s…wow, I can’t even begin on the many problematic things that were shown through her character.

And Cho Chang had every right to be emotional, right? I mean Jesus Christ, people here act so fucking understanding for anyone crying over anything and everything. But no, Cho’s boyfriend, an important person in her life, gets killed and suddenly she’s forever dubbed as the over-emotional, whiny one? But when Hermione gets emotional she’s so ~real~ and ~relatable~

AND LAVENDER BROWN OH MAN. WHAT DID SHE DO TO GET SO MUCH HATE??? Yeah, she got clingy, but like? That’s realistic for some girls, and completely justified. Not that she has to justify it. She didn’t hurt anyone. But people seem to hate her for how she reacted to unrequited love (which is just her being devastated and bitter about it which is completely understandable) and then excuse Snape for how he reacted to unrequited feelings? Okay, Snape is an obvious choice, and a whole new extreme. So let’s take a look at Hermione. Lavender Brown is hated for expressing her emotions, but those people don’t even take a second look at Hermione when she intentionally sought out boys to use and manipulate as a way to hurt Ron. 

JK personally hates Pansy. I totally agree with you regarding how absolute shit JK Rowling treated Pansy. She goes on about how “she’s all the girls who bullied me”  and “the anti-hermione. i hate her.” and “empty-headed, self-obsessed”.

She’s a bully, yeah. But let’s be real here, she hasn’t been any crueler than the Malfoy. And if he got redemption, if he got a story that dove deeper into his character and choices, if he was shown through a more intricate portrayal than just a mean person, then how come Pansy wasn’t given that? 

Simple. JK Rowling hates her because she was an analogy for all the girls who bullied her when she was in school. However, what’s the point of the ongoing punishment and lack of redemption for a girl who was nothing more than mean?

And if anyones tells me that being a bad earns you just that amount of punishment, then how come Hermione - the person JK Rowling mirrored herself in - had traits that weren’t punished or even called out on? She’s manipulative, she’s ruthless, she only gives consideration to her truth, she dismisses consequences when they only affect those who she considers as “evil” without a second doubt. She judges girls for liking things that are feminine. She gives off a message that girls who like make up and boys and clothes are inferior to those who don’t.

Besides, even as a bully, people should understand that although there’s no excuse to do so, she doesn’t owe kindness to people who immediately write her off as evil and without redemption just because she’s in ~the evil house~

39 minutes ago  -  193 notes  -  via  -  ©

fuckyespetercapaldi:

Peter’s first read through.

[x]

41 minutes ago  -  4,221 notes  -  via  -  ©

thecutestofthecute:

 A sleepy yawning baby tortie.

41 minutes ago  -  156 notes  -  via  -  ©

loopyleprechaun:

I googled guinea pig with brussel sprouts and let me tell you I was not disappointed 

41 minutes ago  -  74,943 notes  -  via  -  ©

lavenderpatil:

last-snowfall:

lavenderpatil:

last-snowfall:

deducecanoe:

ppyajunebug:

thelethifoldwitch:

Imagine Hogwarts after the Battle, after the War, sure

But imagine Hogwarts’ students, after their year with the Carrows and Snape.

Imagine a tiny little first-year whose porcupine pincushions still have quills, but to whom Fiendfyre comes easily. The second-year who tried to go back, to fight; whose bravado got Professor Sinistra killed, as she pushed him out of the way of a Killing Curse. The third-year who perfectly brewed poisons, hands shaking, wishing for the courage to spike the Carrows’ cups. The fourth-year who throws away all of their teacups, their palmistry guidebooks, because what use is Divination if it didn’t see this coming? The fifth-year who can barely remember what O.W.L.S. are, let alone that she was supposed to take them. The sixth-year who can’t manage Lumos to save their life, but whose proficiency with the Cruciatus Curse rivals Bellatrix’s.

Imagine the seventh-year who laughs until he cries, thinking about the first-years who will fall asleep in History of Magic while their story is told.

Imagine the Muggleborn first-years left alive, if there are any: imagine what they think of the magical world, when their introduction to it was Death Eaters and being tortured by their classmates for having been born.

Imagine the students who went home to their parents (or guardians, or wards, or orphanages) and showed them what they’d learned: Dark curses, hexes, Unforgiveables; that Muggles are filth, animals, lesser. Who, yes, still can’t transfigure a match into a needle but Mum, there’s a hex that can make you feel as though you’re being stabbed with thousands. (Don’t ask them how they know.)

Imagine the students who will never be able to see Hogwarts as home.

Imagine the students Hogwarts has left, when it starts up again the lack of Muggleborns, blood-traitors, half-bloods, dead and gone the lack of purebloods; the Ministry would have chucked everyone of age (and possibly just below) in Azkaban for Unforgiveables, wouldn’t they?

Imagine how few students there are left to teach; imagine how few teachers are left to teach them.

Imagine the students who can’t walk past a particular classroom, who can’t walk through a hallway, who can’t walk into the Great Hall without having a panic attack or breaking down. Imagine the school-wide discovery that the carriages aren’t horseless after all; that everyone, from the firsties to the teachers, can see Thestrals.

Imagine the memorials, the heaps of flowers and mementoes in every other corner, hallway, classroom; every other step you take on the grounds.

Imagine the ghosts.

Imagine the students destroying Snape’s portrait, using the curses, hexes, even Fiendfyre they’ve been taught how to wield it has to be restored nearly every week; Snape stays with Phineas Nigellus semi-permanently. (None of the other portraits will welcome him. His reasons do not excuse his conduct.)

Imagine the students unable to trust each other everyone informed on everyone, your best friend might turn you in.

Imagine the guilt that everyone carries (it should have been me, it’s my fault s/he’s dead, I told on them, it’s all my fault), the students incapable of meeting each other’s eyes because it’s my fault your best friend, your sibling, your Housemate, your boy/girlfriend is dead.

Imagine the memorials piled high with the wands of the dead. Imagine the memorials piled high with the self-snapped wands of the living.

Imagine the students who are never able to produce a Patronus.

Imagine Boggarts being removed from the curriculum because Riddikulus is near impossible to grasp, even for the sixth- and seventh-years. Because their friends and families dead will never, ever be funny.

Imagine the students for whom magic feels tainted.

Imagine the students who leave the wixen world hell, the students who leave Britain entirely, because there’s nothing left for them there.

Imagine the students who never use magic again.

(Image source.)

(From the mind of the wonderful lavenderpatil, a keen look at how students might be after war.)

Reblogging this kickass post by the equally kickass
lavenderpatil
because everyone should read it

I think… I could be wrong… but everyone Prof Trwylany (sp) said would die at the beginning of every term DID die in the battle of hogwarts? BUt yeah. The year after that was probably filled with grand speeches about those who sacrificed their lives, and how they would rebuild hogwarts, etc. meanwhile… the kids knew. They were there. They knew what it was really like. And the incoming first years probably had a very different relationship with the older kids, who’d seen shit, than in years past. I think there’d be a long year of seriousness and severity… or everyone would try to put on a happy face and pretend that Colin Kreevy wasn’t working on the school paper any more because he was dead. Stiff upper lip. But with a very subdued attitude.

Imagine the seventh years who came back. Because nobody finished their seventh year. That year was a loss. But the ones it really mattered for were them.

Imagine the older kids who are up in the night because they can’t sleep for bad dreams hearing the crying from the lower dorms and finding that little girl who can’t make pincushions but can make Fiendfyre hugging her knees, and saying, “You know what, bring your pillow up, you can sleep on my bed while I read.”

Imagine the new first years, the ones who hear the story on the train, who’re eleven and still young, seeing an older student sitting alone staring blankly and going over to them and saying, “D’you want some of my chocolate frogs?” because they can’t think of anything else to do.

Imagine one finding someone who’s sitting staring at nothing one day and asking in a quiet voice, “Do you need a hug?” and then staying for an hour while the older student cries and cries and hugs them, because some eleven year olds are really smart (and some eleven year olds already came to the school from Bad Shit) and know that sometimes it helps to hold someone you could look after.

Imagine the older students who look at these younger ones coming in, all new and safe and bright, and swearing on Merlin’s grave that nothing will ever, *ever* hurt these kids.

Imagine the alumni of Dumbledore’s Army, who refused to let the fucking Death Eaters win when they were here and kicking and sure as she won’t let them now, finding things to do on weekends, organizing things, refusing to have it so that people just stay there alone being sad. Fuck the third-year rule: *everyone* can go to Hogsmeade, you just buddy up the young kids with the older kids and I mean, fuck, *who’s going to be a threat to the older kids now*?

Imagine them making up insulting nicknames for their old enemies, taking Voldemort and the Carrows and Lestrange and metaphorically spitting on them every time they use them.

Imagine Ron volunteering to take on the Boggart that takes up residence in the one class cupboard because no, look, the stupid thing *still looks like a bloody spider* and look it’s fucking hilarious when you take its legs off and tie it up with a bow. And the class laughs.

Imagine Harry staying at the school for a couple years, even when he’s done, because once people understand how the charm worked - how because he let Voldemort kill him it meant that nothing Voldemort could do could hurt any of them anymore - everyone just feels *better* when he’s there.

Imagine the nights where everyone leaves the common rooms and camps out in the Great Hall and drinks Butterbeer and tells stories and cries and sometimes there are shouting matches because people get so raw, but in the end everyone falls asleep in a pile together.

Imagine all the really, truly inappropriate jokes the survivors make, the ones that make their parents’ eyes fill with tears and terrify the first years, because actually when you’ve been dragged face-first through Hell the *worst shit* becomes fucking funny.

Imagine how the owls don’t have to be kept in the owlry anymore, because every kid needs the animal they brought with them; imagine that for the kids that lost theirs, or never had one, their friends finding them some, buying them some.

Imagine the girl who knows the Cruciatus Curse breaking down crying because she can’t believe she did that, she can’t ever believe she would and she knows she’s wrong and evil and tainted, and Ginny holding her while she cries and when she calms down, Hermione tells her the story of Regulus Black, and about how just because you made shit choices once that doesn’t mean you can’t make better ones now.

Imagine that people have been dealing with this kind of horrible shit all through human history, and people are out there dealing with it today, and yes it absolutely sucks and it’s horrible and the scars it leaves are real and heartbreaking and sometimes people are too badly hurt to go on, but also former child-soldiers play team games and laugh at funny stories and refugee kids with horrible stories love colouring books with bright colours and play games with the friends they’ve made in the camps.

And these are kids who fought. Who fought like little demons. Who *chose* to fight. So yeah, it could be awful. It could be nothing but bleak from beginning to end, a year (a decade) of sternness and unhappiness. But it doesn’t have to be; it isn’t guaranteed.


(and as @tygermama notes, we Muggles have been figuring out this shit: we give it names and throw our best guesses at it, and some of them are good. So there’s help there, too.)

This is my favourite response to this ficlet so far, oh my goodness, thank you.

:3 I’m really glad you liked. The original point is really good - the place is going to be a mess, not just in the building but in all those messed up kids. And it’s not going to go away or be easy and some of them will be too messed up and too hurt to thrive again, and a lot of them will have to redefine “thrive”.

But all these kids were fighters. And I’d like to think they kept fighting. Just now the fight is find some way to live a worthwhile life, instead of bring the bastards down. So I had a sudden swell of Feelings. :3 

You’re very right. My whole motivation for writing this was the dearth of fics we see dealing with the aftermath of the war - or, more accurately, the students, especially those not in the DA. So it was dark, and unhappy, and depressing, and all of that, because I was focused on that part.

Your addition has made it bittersweet in a really good way, though, and the reminder that the students are fighters and that they would heal each other is a good one - and one that I kind of forgot about, when I was writing this, and thinking about only the sad things. Thank you for this. :)

43 minutes ago  -  33,096 notes  -  via  -  ©